A Her-Story of the World

This past Wednesday, August 26 marked the 49th annual Women’s Equality Day, commemorating the 1920 adoption of the Nineteenth Amendment, which prohibits governments from denying citizens the right to vote on the basis of sex. The passage of this historic legislation was one of many topics covered in Georgina Wells’ ’04 Women in History class, which was offered as part of the first ever Open Grace Summer program. 

Each week, Ms. Wells met with her class to discuss prominent women in politics, science, literature, sports and the arts, including Queen Lili’uokalani of Hawaii, Marie Curie, Maya Angelou, Billie Jean King and Frida Kahlo, among others, as well as the many unsung figures in women’s history. Short video clips and digital exhibitions kicked off lively discussions, and students were invited to suggest themes of particular interest to them, helping to drive the direction of the course.

Queen Liliʻuokalani of the Hawaiian Kingdom

When deciding what to teach this summer, the choice was an obvious one for Ms. Wells, a seasoned history teacher. “I wanted to offer this class because of the passion I see every year in my students to learn about women’s contributions to the history I teach,” she noted. 

Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

Ms. Wells also spoke with her students about intersectionality and examined the inherent relationship between women’s liberation and racial justice, acknowledging that the 1920 legislation, and those who fought to see it ratified, failed to recognize Black women. Ms. Wells pointed out, “Middle schoolers are quite attuned to who and what usually gets centered in the narratives, and they don’t want to be confined to that, just as I do not want to confine them to it. To that end, I also made sure to choose a diverse range of women for us to focus on this summer.”

Shirley Chisholm, first Black woman elected to the United States Congress

Becoming Strong Visual Storytellers

By Collin Todd, Visual Arts Teacher

As students adapt to the ever-changing world around them, the way they interact with information both educational and social is increasingly becoming more visual. It is important for students to have the tools and conceptual foundations for becoming strong visual storytellers. This can take the form of photographs and videos they share with their peers and family as well as visual reports, documentaries, and presentations as part of their education. My Open Grace Summer course offerings were geared to empower the students as storytellers by helping them gain the technical ability to be a successful visual storyteller in photography and video as well as understand the conceptual meanings behind what makes films engaging and important to our culture. 

In our Introduction to Photoshop class, we explored the foundational tools and concepts of digitally manipulating photographs, allowing students creatively express themselves beyond the idea of the snapshot. Students produced a range of photo collages and illustrations. 

Our Advanced Photoshop course centered around the idea of expanding illustration and design possibilities in the software while utilizing photographs as a starting point. The students produced several logos and designs. 

The Introduction to Final Cut Pro class gave students hands-on experience in creating a music video as they learned the ins and outs of the video editing software. 

Finally, the Introduction to Adobe Premiere class provided the students with a platform to create their own PSAs about life during a pandemic. 

You can view some of the students’ Photoshop work here and their video work here!

Video password is ” opengrace2020 “