Dances for Very Small Spaces

By Jenny Pommiss, Dance

When Grace was forced to shut its doors, the advanced, senior-only Dance Repertory Class began a project I called, “Dances for Very Small Spaces.” The project was born out of quarantine and the desire, in fact, the need, to keep moving. It was inspired by “52 Portraits” (2016), which was a digital collaboration between British choreographer Jonathan Burrows, composer Matteo Fargion, and video maker Hugo Glendinning. In class, students were asked to look at their homes, the places where they may have lived all their lives, in a completely new way. They scouted locations for a dance that would not only use their bedroom or living room as a backdrop, but as a dance partner. Students were encouraged to have the location drive their choreographic explorations. They were then asked to film themselves from a variety of different perspectives, add music, and edit that footage together. At the same time, the students were asked to take time to reflect on what Dance has meant to them at Grace, how the pandemic has affected them, and how it may continue to affect Dance as a discipline moving forward. At the end, I whittled their final projects down to a minute each and layered their interviews over their chosen sound so that they could be strung together. The result was a collection of deeply personal movement portraits that represented four years of growth in the Dance Program at Grace. 

Check our Website in the coming days to see the students’ full final projects. In the meantime, please hear their voices and watch their dancing in a beautiful compilation. You can watch Dancing With Big Hearts in Small Spaces: Senior Edition, using the password: Seniors.

This project then became a component of a larger, full Ensemble piece called “Dancing with Big Hearts in Small Spaces.” This was a digital reimagining of the Ensemble’s canceled live performance, which was set to go up on April 17 and 18 in Tuttle Hall. As Devon M. ‘20 says in the piece, “Honestly, when I first heard that schools were going to be shut down, I did not think that Dance was going to continue”. To his surprise, the Ensemble continued to meet twice weekly to move together and explore what it means to dance alone and in place. Visiting teacher Simon Thomas-Train and I collaborated on the concept and direction. Josie M. ‘22 offers, “We have kept going….we are finding other ways to keep moving…and to keep the spirit of dance and the amazing gift of dance alive.” Each week, after a physical warm-up, students were given prompts, such as “make a dance in a doorway” or “use today’s headlines as an inspiration for a dance”. They were then asked to film themselves using a variety of different camera angles. The dancers also interviewed themselves, which gave their virtual audience the opportunity to delve deeper into the dancers’ creative process. You can view the full performance here, using the password: Bighearts.

For the virtual finale, I was inspired by the choreography and editing techniques used in a music video by Thao & The Get Down Stay Down that was produced in the early days of the quarantine and choreographed specifically for Zoom. I loved how it utilized the video medium to make dancers appear connected in new and exciting ways. You can view the Finale here, using the password: Finale.

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